1932

Abstract

This review outlines the development of religious cognition, with a particular focus on the cultural processes involved in the transmission of religious concepts and beliefs. The mechanisms of development of religious concepts and beliefs are made salient by the fact that these concepts () are unavailable for direct observation or experimentation by the child and () involve deeply held personal and collective commitments on the part of adult members of distinct cultural groups defined by specific beliefs and practices. As such, this review highlights how the study of religious cognition provides a critical lens for developmental science and makes clear the mutually constituted relationship between cognition and culture. The review covers development in three key domains of religious cognition: religious agents, the nature of existence, and religious identity. We additionally describe research into religious socialization and conclude with suggestions for future research.

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2022-12-09
2024-06-14
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