1932

Abstract

Parthenogenesis is asexual reproduction without any required participation from males and, as such, is a null model for sexual reproduction. In a comparative context, we can expand our understanding of the evolution and ecology of sex by investigating the consequences of parthenogenesis. In this review, we examine the theoretical predictions of and empirical results on the evolution of asexual reproduction in vertebrates, focusing on recent studies addressing the origins and geographic spread of parthenogenetic lineages and the genomic consequences of an asexual life history. With advances in computational methods and genome technologies, researchers are poised to make rapid and significant progress in studying the origin and evolution of parthenogenesis in vertebrates, thus providing an important perspective on understanding biodiversity patterns of both asexual and sexual populations.

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2020-11-02
2024-06-13
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  • Article Type: Review Article
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