1932

Abstract

The accumulation of data on the genomic bases of adaptation has triggered renewed interest in theoretical models of adaptation. Among these models, Fisher's geometric model (FGM) has received a lot of attention over the past two decades. FGM is based on a continuous multidimensional phenotypic landscape, but it is mostly used for the emerging properties of individual mutation effects. Despite its apparent simplicity and limited number of parameters, FGM integrates a full model of mutation and epistatic interactions that allows the study of both beneficial and deleterious mutations and, subsequently, the fate of evolving populations. In this review, I present the different properties of FGM and the qualitative and quantitative support they have received from experimental evolution data. I then discuss how to estimate the different parameters of the model and outline some future directions to connect FGM and the molecular determinants of adaptation.

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2014-11-23
2024-06-24
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