1932

Abstract

vegetable and oilseed crops are attacked by several different flea beetle species (Chrysomelidae: Alticini). Over the past decades, most research has focused on two species, and , which are major pests of oilseed rape in North America. More recently, and especially after the ban of neonicotinoids in the European Union, the cabbage stem flea beetle, , has become greatly important and is now considered to be the major pest of winter oilseed rape in Europe. The major challenges to flea beetle control are the prediction of population dynamics in the field, differential susceptibility to insecticides, and the lack of resistant plant cultivars and other economically viable alternative management strategies. At the same time, many fundamental aspects of flea beetle biology and ecology, which may be relevant for the development of sustainable control strategies, are not well understood. This review focuses on the interactions between flea beetles and plants and summarizes the literature on current management strategies with an emphasis on the potential for biological control in flea beetle management.

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2024-01-25
2024-06-13
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