1932

Abstract

This review provides an assessment of hormesis, a highly conserved evolutionary dose-response adaptive strategy that leads to the development of acquired resilience within well-defined temporal windows. The hormetic-based acquired resilience has a central role in affecting healthy aging, slowing the onset and progression of numerous neurodegenerative and other age-related diseases, and reducing risks and damage due to heart attacks, stroke, and other serious conditions of public health and medical importance. The review provides the historical foundations of hormesis, its dose-response features, its capacity for generalization across biological models and endpoints measured, and its mechanistic foundations. The review also provides a focus on the adaptive features of hormesis, i.e., its capacity to upregulate acquired resilience and how this can be mediated by numerous plant-derived extracts, such as curcumin, ginseng, , resveratrol, and green tea, that induce a broad spectrum of chemopreventive effects via hormesis.

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2021-03-25
2024-04-25
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