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Abstract

Glucosinolates (GSLs) are a class of sulfur-containing compounds found predominantly in the genus of the Brassicaceae family. Certain edible plants in , known as vegetables, are among the most commonly consumed vegetables in the world. Over the last three decades, mounting evidence has suggested an inverse association between consumption of vegetables and the risk of various types of cancer. The biological activities of vegetables have been largely attributed to the hydrolytic products of GSLs. GSLs can be hydrolyzed by enzymes; thermal or chemical degradation also breaks down GSLs. There is considerable variation of GSLs in spp., which are caused by genetic and environmental factors. Most vegetables are consumed after cooking; common cooking methods have a complex influence on the levels of GSLs. The variationof GSLs in vegetables and the influence of cooking and processing methods ultimately affect their intake and health-promoting properties.

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2021-03-25
2024-04-15
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/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-food-070620-025744
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