1932

Abstract

In the past 20 years, there has been a growing interest in the phenomenon of workplace envy. This article provides an overarching review and analysis of the workplace envy literature. We first consider conceptual and measurement challenges facing envy researchers. We then review the current knowledge base in the research with a focus on synthesizing what we have learned regarding workplace envy's transmutations, highlighting directions for future research. We explore two relatively understudied areas in the envy literature—antecedents of envy and the experience of being envied. We discuss methodologies used in the literature to study envy and outcomes and conclude with a focus on cross-cultural and practical implications.

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2021-01-21
2024-05-24
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