1932

Abstract

Recent research has re-emphasized the importance of vocational interests for understanding workplace attitudes and behavior. As a result, there is a renewed interest in the assessment of vocational interests in organizations. Numerous interest assessments have been developed over the past century, and they are now administered to millions of people throughout the world. Nevertheless, there is still work to be done, particularly as interest assessments are increasingly being used in organizational settings. This article reviews developments in interest assessments and discusses the implications of their use for both research and practice. It discusses the advantages and disadvantages of examining vocational interests in organizational contexts and proposes future research directions.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-orgpsych-012420-083120
2022-01-21
2024-06-18
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/orgpsych/9/1/annurev-orgpsych-012420-083120.html?itemId=/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-orgpsych-012420-083120&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

Literature Cited

  1. Abrahams NM, Neumann I, Githens WH. 1971. Faking vocational interests: simulated versus real life motivation. Pers. Psychol. 24:5–12
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Allen TD. 2013. The work-family role interface: a synthesis of the research from industrial and organizational psychology. Handbook of Psychology: Industrial and Organizational Psychology 12 NW Schmitt, S Highhouse 698–718 Hoboken, NJ: Wiley, , 2nd ed..
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Alley WE, Matthews MD 1982. The Vocational Interest Career Examination: a description of the instrument and possible applications. J. Psychol.: Interdiscip. Appl. 112:169–93
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Armstrong PI, Allison W, Rounds J 2008. Development and initial validation of brief public domain RIASEC marker scales. J. Vocat. Behav. 73:287–99
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Assouline M, Meir EI 1987. Meta-analysis of the relationship between congruence and well-being measures. J. Vocat. Behav. 31:319–32
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Baker HE, Styer JS, Harmon L, Pommerich M. 2010. Development and validation of the FYI-A preliminary report Tech. Rep. M67004–08-C-0008 US Dep. Defense Arlington, VA:
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Blackburn K, Schirillo J. 2012. Emotive hemispheric differences measured in real-life portraits using pupil diameter and subjective aesthetic preferences. Exp. Brain Res. 219:447–55
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Bloland PA. 1984. Leisure and career development: for college students. J. Career Dev. 11:119–28
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Brown SD, Gore JPA. 1994. An evaluation of interest congruence indices: distribution characteristics and measurement properties. J. Vocat. Behav. 45:310–27
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Cable DM, DeRue DS. 2002. The convergent and discriminant validity of subjective fit perceptions. J. Appl. Psychol. 87:875–84
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Campbell DP. 1995. The Campbell Interest and Skill Survey (CISS): a product of ninety years of psychometric evolution. J. Career Assess. 3:391–410
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Campbell DP, Borgen FH, Eastes SH, Johansson CB, Peterson RA. 1968. A set of basic interest scales for the Strong Vocational Interest Blank for men. J. Appl. Psychol. Monogr. 52:1–54
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Campion MC, Campion MA, Campion ED, Reider MH 2016. Initial investigation into computer scoring of candidate essays for personnel selection. J. Appl. Psychol. 101:958–75
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Cao M, Drasgow F. 2019. Does forcing reduce faking? A meta-analytic review of forced-choice personality measures in high-stakes situations. J. Appl. Psychol. 104:1347–68
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Carter NT, Dalal DK, Boyce AS, O'Connell MS, Kung MC, Delgado KM 2014. Uncovering curvilinear relationships between conscientiousness and job performance: how theoretically appropriate measurement makes an empirical difference. J. Appl. Psychol. 99:564–86
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Chernyshenko OS, Stark S, Drasgow F, Roberts BW 2007. Constructing personality scales under the assumptions of an ideal point response process: toward increasing the flexibility of personality measures. Psychol. Assess. 19:188–106
    [Google Scholar]
  17. CPP (Consult. Psychol. Press) 2004. Strong Interest Inventory Palo Alto, CA: CPP
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Dalal DK, Carter NT. 2015. Consequences of ignoring ideal point items for applied decisions and criterion-related validity estimates. J. Bus. Psychol. 30:3483–98
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Davison HK, Bing MN, Kluemper DH, Roth PL 2016. Social media as a personnel selection and hiring resource: reservations and recommendations. Social Media in Employee Selection and Recruitment RN Landers, G Schmidt 15–42 Basel, Switz: Springer Int.
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Day SX, Rounds J. 1997.. “ A little more than kin, and less than kind”: Basic interests in vocational research and career counseling. Career Dev. Q. 45:207–20
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Deng C-P, Armstrong PI, Rounds J 2007. The fit of Holland's RIASEC model to U.S. occupations. J. Vocat. Behav. 71:1–22
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Donnay D, Morris ML, Schaumbhut N, Thompson R. 2004. Strong Interest Inventory Manual Palo Alto, CA: Consult. Psychol. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Drasgow F, Chernyshenko OS, Stark S. 2010. 75 years after Likert: Thurstone was right! Ind. . Organ. Psychol. 3:465–76
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Einarsdóttir S, Eyjólfsdóttir , Rounds J. 2013. Development of indigenous basic interest scales: re-structuring the Icelandic interest space. J. Vocat. Behav. 82:2105–15
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Farmer WL, Watson SE, Alderton DL, Michael PG, Hindelang R 2006. Improving person-job congruence during the classification process: item development and initial testing of a pictorial interest instrument. Tech. Note 06–8, Navy Pers. Res., Stud, Technol. Div. Bureau Naval Pers. Millington, TN:
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Garry R. 1953. Individual differences in ability to fake vocational interests. J. Appl. Psychol. 37:33–37
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Hanna A, Rounds J 2020. How accurate are interest inventories? A quantitative review of career choice hit rates. Psychol. Bull. 146:765–96
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Hansen JC 2019. Interest inventories. Handbook of Psychological Assessment G Goldstein, DN Allen, J DeLuca 169–190 Cambridge, MA: Academic
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Hansen JC, Scullard MG. 2002. Psychometric evidence for the Leisure Interest Questionnaire and analyses of the structure of leisure interests. J. Couns. Psychol. 49:331–41
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Hanson MA, Paullin CJ, Bruskiewicz KT, White LA. 2003. The Army Vocational Interest Career Examination Paper presented at the 45th annual conference of the International Military Testing Association Pensacola, FL: Nov. 4–6
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Harackiewicz JM, Barron KE, Tauer JM, Carter SM, Elliot AJ 2000. Short-term and long-term consequences of achievement goals: predicting interest and performance over time. J. Educ. Psychol. 92:316–30
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Harrington T, Long J. 2013. The history of interest inventories and career assessments in career counseling. Career Dev. Q. 61:83–92
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Hawkes B, Cek I, Handler C 2018. The gamification of employee selection tools: an exploration of viability, utility, and future directions. Educational and Psychological Testing in a Global Context. Next Generation Technology-Enhanced Assessment: Global Perspectives on Occupational and Workplace Testing JC Scott, D Bartram, DH Reynolds 288–313 Cambridge, UK: Cambridge Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Hendel DD, Harrold RD. 2004. Undergraduate student leisure interests over three decades. Coll. Stud. J. 38:557–68
    [Google Scholar]
  35. Hidi S, Baird W. 1986. Interestingness—a neglected variable in discourse processing. Cogn. Sci. 10:179–94
    [Google Scholar]
  36. Hoff KA, Song QC, Wee CJ, Phan WMJ, Rounds J. 2020. Interest fit and job satisfaction: a systematic review and meta-analysis. J. Vocat. Behav. 123:103503
    [Google Scholar]
  37. Holland JL. 1958. A personality inventory employing occupational titles. J. Appl. Psychol. 42:36–42
    [Google Scholar]
  38. Holland JL. 1959. A theory of vocational choice. J. Couns. Psychol. 6:35–45
    [Google Scholar]
  39. Holland JL. 1971. The Counselor's Guide to the Self-Directed Search Palo Alto, CA: Consult. Psychol. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  40. Holland JL. 1997. Making Vocational Choices: A Theory of Vocational Personalities and Work Environments Odessa, FL: Psychol. Assess. Resour., 3rd ed..
    [Google Scholar]
  41. Holland JL, Messer MA. 2013. Self-Directed Search: Form R. Professional Manual Lutz, FL: PAR. , 5th ed..
    [Google Scholar]
  42. Hough L, Barge B, Kamp J 2001a. Assessment of personality, temperament, vocational interests, and work outcome preferences. Exploring the Limits of Personnel Selection and Classification JP Campbell, DJ Knapp 111–54 Mahwah, NJ:; Erlbaum
    [Google Scholar]
  43. Hough LM, Oswald FL, Ployhart RE. 2001b. Determinants, detection and amelioration of adverse impact in personnel selection procedures: issues, evidence and lessons learned. Int. J. Sel. Assess. 9:152–94
    [Google Scholar]
  44. Huang JL, Pearce M. 2013. The other side of the coin: vocational interests, interest differentiation and annual income at the occupation level of analysis. J. Vocat. Behav. 83:315–26
    [Google Scholar]
  45. Huang JL, Ran S, Liu M 2019. Vocational interests in a global business environment. Vocational Interests in the Workplace: Rethinking Behavior at Work CD Nye, J Rounds 224–50 New York: Routledge
    [Google Scholar]
  46. Ingerick M, Rumsey MG. 2014. Taking the measure of work interests: past, present, and future. Mil. Psychol. 26:165–81
    [Google Scholar]
  47. Johansson CB. 1986. Career Assessment Inventory: Enhanced Version Minneapolis, MN: Natl. Comput. Syst.
    [Google Scholar]
  48. Johnson JF, Romay S, Barron LG 2020. Air Force Work Interest Navigator (AF-WIN) to improve person-job match: development, validation, and initial implementation. Mil. Psychol. 32:111–26
    [Google Scholar]
  49. Jones KS, Newman DA, Su R, Rounds J 2021a. Black-white differences in vocational interests: meta-analysis and boundary conditions. J. Bus. Psychol. 36:589–607
    [Google Scholar]
  50. Jones KS, Newman DA, Su R, Rounds J 2021b. Vocational interests and adverse impact: how attraction and selection on vocational interests relate to adverse impact potential. J. Appl. Psychol. https://doi.org/10.1037/apl0000893. In press
    [Crossref] [Google Scholar]
  51. Kirkendall CD, Nye CD, Rounds J, Drasgow F, Chernyshenko OS, Stark S. 2020. Adaptive Vocational Interest Diagnostic: informing and improving the job assignment process. Mil. Psychol. 32:91–100
    [Google Scholar]
  52. Kosinski M, Stillwell D, Graepel T. 2013. Private traits and attributes are predictable from digital records of human behavior. PNAS 110:155802–5
    [Google Scholar]
  53. Kristof-Brown AL, Zimmerman RD, Johnson EC. 2005. Consequences of individual's fit at work: a meta-analysis of person-job, person-organization, person-group, and person-supervisor fit. Pers. Psychol. 58:2281–342
    [Google Scholar]
  54. Landers RN, Schmidt GB. 2016. Social Media in Employee Selection and Recruitment: Theory, Practice, and Current Challenges Basel, Switz: Springer Int.
    [Google Scholar]
  55. Lang JW, Tay L. 2021. The science and practice of item response theory in organizations. Annu. Rev. Organ. Psychol. Organ. Behav. 8:311–38
    [Google Scholar]
  56. Leuty ME, Hansen JIC, Speaks SZ. 2016. Vocational and leisure interests: a profile-level approach to examining interests. J. Career Assess. 24:215–39
    [Google Scholar]
  57. Liao HY, Armstrong PI, Rounds J 2008. Development and initial validation of public domain Basic Interest Markers. J. Vocat. Behav. 73:159–83
    [Google Scholar]
  58. Lievens F, Patterson F. 2011. The validity and incremental validity of knowledge tests, low-fidelity simulations, and high-fidelity simulations for predicting job performance in advanced-level high-stakes selection. J. Appl. Psychol. 96:927–40
    [Google Scholar]
  59. Lubinski D. 2020. Understanding educational, occupational, and creative outcomes requires assessing intraindividual differences in abilities and interests. PNAS 117:2916720–22
    [Google Scholar]
  60. Marquez S, Nye CD, Wee S. 2019. Are vocational interests susceptible to faking? Paper presented at the 34th annual conference of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology National Harbor, MD: April 4–6
    [Google Scholar]
  61. McCarthy JM, Bauer TN, Truxillo DM, Anderson NR, Costa AC, Ahmed SM 2017. Applicant perspectives during selection: a review addressing “So what?,” “What's new?,” and “Where to next?”. J. Manag. 43:61693–1725
    [Google Scholar]
  62. Miller MJ. 1991. Accuracy of the Leisure Activities Finder: expanding Holland's typology. J. Vocat. Behav. 39:362–68
    [Google Scholar]
  63. Moore C, Lee SY, Kim K, Cable DM 2017. The advantage of being oneself: the role of applicant self-verification in organizational hiring decisions. J. Appl. Psychol. 102:111493–1513
    [Google Scholar]
  64. Morgeson FP, Campion MA, Dipboye RL, Hollenbeck JR, Murphy K, Schmitt N 2007. Reconsidering the use of personality tests in personnel selection contexts. Pers. Psychol. 60:683–729
    [Google Scholar]
  65. Nauta MM. 2010. The development, evolution, and status of Holland's theory of vocational personalities: reflections and future directions for counseling psychology. J. Couns. Psychol. 57:11–22
    [Google Scholar]
  66. Neumann G, Olitsky N, Robbins S. 2009. Job congruence, academic achievement, and earnings. Labour Econ 16:503–9
    [Google Scholar]
  67. Newman DA, Lyon JS. 2009. Recruitment efforts to reduce adverse impact: targeted recruiting for personality, cognitive ability, and diversity. J. Appl. Psychol. 94:298–317
    [Google Scholar]
  68. Nye CD, Bhatia S, Prasad J 2019a. Vocational interests and work outcomes. Vocational Interests in the Workplace: Rethinking Behavior at Work CD Nye, J Rounds 97–128 New York: Routledge
    [Google Scholar]
  69. Nye CD, Butt SM, Bradburn J, Prasad J. 2018a. Interests as predictors of performance: an omitted and underappreciated variable. J. Vocat. Behav. 108:178–89
    [Google Scholar]
  70. Nye CD, Prasad J, Bradburn J, Elizondo F. 2018b. Improving the operationalization of interest congruence using polynomial regression. J. Vocat. Behav. 104:154–69
    [Google Scholar]
  71. Nye CD, Prasad J, Rounds J. 2021a. The effects of vocational interests on motivation, satisfaction, and performance: test of a mediated model. J. Vocat. Behav. 127:103583
    [Google Scholar]
  72. Nye CD, Rounds J. 2019. Vocational Interests in the Workplace: Rethinking Behavior at Work New York: Routledge
    [Google Scholar]
  73. Nye CD, Rounds J, Kirkendall CD, Drasgow F, Chernyshenko OS, Stark S. 2019b. Adaptive Vocational Interest Diagnostic: development and initial validation Tech. Rep. 1378 US Army Res. Inst. Behav. Soc. Sci. Ft. Belvoir, VA:
    [Google Scholar]
  74. Nye CD, Rounds J, Walker R, Swaney K, Page R, Morris M. 2019c. Exploring the basic interest structure of vocational interests Paper presented during the “Theoretical Advances in Vocational Interest Research: Moving Beyond Holland's Theory” symposium (Chair B Wille) of the 34th annual conference of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology National Harbor, MD: April 4–6
    [Google Scholar]
  75. Nye CD, Su R, Rounds J, Drasgow F. 2012. Vocational interests and performance: a quantitative summary of over 60 years of research. Perspect. Psychol. Sci. 7:384–403
    [Google Scholar]
  76. Nye CD, Su R, Rounds J, Drasgow F. 2017. Interest congruence and performance: revisiting recent meta-analytic findings. J. Vocat. Behav. 98:138–51
    [Google Scholar]
  77. Nye CD, Wille B, Amory J, De Fruyt F 2021b. Are work activities related to interest change over time? A 22-year longitudinal study. J. Pers. Soc. Psychol. https://doi.org/10.1037/pspp0000360 . In press
    [Crossref] [Google Scholar]
  78. Oswald FL, Hough LM, Zuo C 2019. Personnel selection and vocational interests. Vocational Interests in the Workplace: Rethinking Behavior at Work CD Nye, J Rounds 129–64 New York: Routledge
    [Google Scholar]
  79. Park G, Schwartz HA, Eichstaedt JC, Kern ML, Kosinski M et al. 2015. Automatic personality assessment through social media language. J. Pers. Soc. Psychol. 108:934–52
    [Google Scholar]
  80. Parsons F. 1909. Choosing a Vocation Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin
    [Google Scholar]
  81. Phan WMJ, Amrhein R, Rounds J, Lewis P. 2019. Contextualizing interest scales with emojis: implications for measurement and validity. J. Career Assess. 27:1114–33
    [Google Scholar]
  82. Primavera MT, Church AT, Katigbak MS, Bruna L, White JR, Peradilla I 2010. The structure of vocational interests in Filipino adolescents. J. Vocat. Behav. 77:2213–26
    [Google Scholar]
  83. Renninger KA, Hidi SE. 2016. The power of interest for motivation and engagement New York: Routledge
    [Google Scholar]
  84. Renninger KA, Hidi SE 2019. Interest development as a dynamic process in the workplace. Vocational Interests in the Workplace: Rethinking Behavior at Work CD Nye, J Rounds 39–58 New York: Routledge
    [Google Scholar]
  85. Roth PL, Van Iddekinge CH, DeOrtentiis PS, Hackney KJ, Zhang L, Buster MA. 2017. Hispanic and Asian performance on selection procedures: a narrative and meta-analytic review of 12 common predictors. J. Appl. Psychol. 102:1178–1202
    [Google Scholar]
  86. Rounds J, Ming CWJ, Cao M, Song C, Lewis P 2016a. Development of an O*NET® Mini Interest Profiler (Mini-IP) for mobile devices: psychometric characteristics Rep., Natl. Cent. O*NET Dev. US Dep. Labor Raleigh, NC:
    [Google Scholar]
  87. Rounds J, Phan WMJ, Amrhein R, Lewis P 2016b. Examining the efficacy of emoji anchors for the O*NET Interest Profiler Short Form Rep., Natl. Cent. O*NET Dev. US Dep. Labor Raleigh, NC:
    [Google Scholar]
  88. Rounds J, Su R. 2014. The nature and power of interests. Curr. Dir. Psychol. Sci. 23:98–103
    [Google Scholar]
  89. Rounds J, Su R, Lewis P, Rivkin D. 2010. O*NET Interest Profiler Short Form psychometric characteristics: summary. Rep., Natl. Cent. O*NET Dev. US Dep. Labor Raleigh, NC:
    [Google Scholar]
  90. Rounds J, Tracey TJ. 1996. Cross-cultural structural equivalence of RIASEC models and measures. J. Couns. Psychol. 43:310–29
    [Google Scholar]
  91. Rounds J, Walker CM, Day SX, Hubert L, Lewis P, Rivkin D. 1999. O*NET Interest Profiler: reliability, validity, and self-scoring Rep., Natl. Cent. O*NET Dev. US Dep. Labor Raleigh, NC:
    [Google Scholar]
  92. Ryan AM, King DD 2019. Connecting concepts: effects of diversity of interests and interests’ effects on diversity. Vocational Interests in the Workplace: Rethinking Behavior at Work CD Nye, J Rounds 205–23 New York: Routledge
    [Google Scholar]
  93. Ryan AM, Nye CD 2021. Fairness in technology-enhanced selection assessments in employment settings: promises and challenges. Fairness in Educational and Psychological Testing: Examining Theoretical, Research, Practice, and Policy Implications of the 2014 Standards K Geisinger, JL Jonson Washington, DC: Am. Educ. Res. Assoc In press
    [Google Scholar]
  94. Sackett PR, Ellingson JE. 1997. The effects of forming multi-predictor composites on group differences and adverse impact. Pers. Psychol. 50:707–21
    [Google Scholar]
  95. Sackett PR, Lievens F, Van Iddekinge CH, Kuncel NR. 2017. Individual differences and their measurement: a review of 100 years of research. J. Appl. Psychol. 102:254–73
    [Google Scholar]
  96. Schmit MJ, Ryan AM, Stierwalt SL, Powell AB. 1995. Frame-of-reference effects on personality scale scores and criterion-related validity. J. Appl. Psychol. 80:607–20
    [Google Scholar]
  97. Schneider B. 1987. The people make the place. Pers. Psychol. 40:3437–53
    [Google Scholar]
  98. Shaffer JA, Postlethwaite BE. 2012. A matter of context: a meta-analytic investigation of the relative validity of contextualized and noncontextualized personality measures. Pers. Psychol. 65:445–94
    [Google Scholar]
  99. Silvia PJ. 2008. Interest—the curious emotion. Curr. Dir. Psychol. Sci. 17:57–60
    [Google Scholar]
  100. Stark S, Chernyshenko OS, Drasgow F, White LA 2012. Adaptive testing with multidimensional pairwise preference items: improving the efficiency of personality and other noncognitive assessments. Organ. Res. Methods 15:463–87
    [Google Scholar]
  101. Stark S, Chernyshenko OS, Drasgow F, Williams BA 2006. Examining assumptions about item responding in personality assessment: Should ideal point methods be considered for scale development and scoring?. J. Appl. Psychol. 91:25–39
    [Google Scholar]
  102. Statistics Iceland 1994. Ístarf95: Íslensk starfaflokkun með skýringum og dæmum [Icelandic occupational classification system: examples and explanations]. Reykjavík, Iceland: Statistics Iceland
    [Google Scholar]
  103. Strong EK Jr. 1927. Vocational Interest Blank Stanford, CA: Stanford Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  104. Su R. 2020. The three faces of interests: an integrative review of interest research in vocational, organizational, and educational psychology. J. Vocat. Behav. 116:103240
    [Google Scholar]
  105. Su R, Nye CD 2017. Interests and person-environment fit: a new perspective on workforce readiness and success. Building Better Students: Preparations for the Workforce J Burrus, KD Mattern, B Naemi, RD Roberts 177–206 New York: Oxford Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  106. Su R, Rounds J. 2015. All STEM fields are not created equal: people and things interests explain gender disparities across STEM fields. Front. Psychol. 6:189
    [Google Scholar]
  107. Su R, Rounds J, Armstrong PI. 2009. Men and things, women and people: a meta-analysis of sex differences in interests. Psychol. Bull. 135:859–84
    [Google Scholar]
  108. Su R, Tay L, Liao HY, Zhang Q, Rounds J. 2019. Toward a dimensional model of vocational interests. J. Appl. Psychol. 104:5690–714
    [Google Scholar]
  109. Tay L, Drasgow F, Rounds J, Williams BA. 2009. Fitting measurement models to vocational interest data: Are dominance models ideal?. J. Appl. Psychol. 94:1287–1304
    [Google Scholar]
  110. Tinsley HEA. 2000. The congruence myth revisited. J. Vocat. Behav. 56:405–23
    [Google Scholar]
  111. Tippins NT. 2015. Technology and assessment in selection. Annu. Rev. Organ. Psychol. Organ. Behav. 2:551–82
    [Google Scholar]
  112. Trenberth L. 2005. The role, nature and purpose of leisure and its contribution to individual development and well-being. Br. J. Guid. Couns. 33:1–6
    [Google Scholar]
  113. Tsabari O, Tziner A, Meir EI 2005. Updated meta-analysis on the relationship between congruence and satisfaction. J. Career Assess. 13:216–32
    [Google Scholar]
  114. Van Iddekinge CH, Putka DJ, Campbell JP. 2011a. Reconsidering vocational interests for personnel selection: the validity of an interest-based selection test in relation to job knowledge, job performance, and continuance intentions. . J. Appl. Psychol. 96:113–33
    [Google Scholar]
  115. Van Iddekinge CH, Roth PL, Putka DJ, Lanivich SE. 2011b. Are you interested? A meta-analysis of relations between vocational interests and employee performance and turnover. J. Appl. Psychol. 96:1167–94
    [Google Scholar]
  116. Venz L, Wang M 2019. The importance of interests for understanding retirement. Vocational Interests in the Workplace: Rethinking Behavior at Work CD Nye, J Rounds 165–88 New York: Routledge
    [Google Scholar]
  117. Wall JL, Wise LL, Baker HE. 1996. Development of the Interest-Finder: a new RIASEC-based interest inventory. Meas. Eval. Couns. Dev. 29:134–52
    [Google Scholar]
  118. Watson SE. 2020. Job Opportunities in the Navy (JOIN). Mil. Psychol. 32:101–10
    [Google Scholar]
  119. Wee S, Newman DA, Song QC, Schinka JA. 2021. Vocational interests, gender, and job performance: two person–occupation cross-level interactions. Pers. Psychol. 74:2323–68
    [Google Scholar]
  120. Wessel JL, Ryan AM, Oswald FL 2008. The relationship between objective and perceived fit with academic major, adaptability, and major-related outcomes. J. Vocat. Behav. 72:363–76
    [Google Scholar]
  121. Zickar MJ, Min H 2019. A history of vocational interest measurement. Vocational Interests in the Workplace: Rethinking Behavior at Work CD Nye, J Rounds 59–79 New York: Routledge
    [Google Scholar]
/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-orgpsych-012420-083120
Loading
/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-orgpsych-012420-083120
Loading

Data & Media loading...

  • Article Type: Review Article
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error