1932

Abstract

Malaria remains a major public health threat in tropical and subtropical regions across the world. Even though less than 1% of malaria infections are fatal, this leads to about 430,000 deaths per year, predominantly in young children in sub-Saharan Africa. Therefore, it is imperative to understand why a subset of infected individuals develop severe syndromes and some of them die and what differentiates these cases from the majority that recovers. Here, we discuss progress made during the past decade in our understanding of malaria pathogenesis, focusing on the major human parasite .

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2020-01-24
2024-06-21
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