1932

Abstract

I have had the singular opportunity to perform research and to participate in medical education. Not unexpectedly, people have asked me which of the two was more important to me. My answer has always been and remains that I am equally passionate about research and teaching. My research has been curiosity driven and not purposeful; hence, I was willing to take risks. That my research led to the discovery of natural killer cells and the unraveling of the molecular basis of a human disease was an unexpected reward. By contrast, my interest in medical education was purposeful, with the goal of improving healthcare by teaching pathology as the scientific foundation of medicine. It started with participation in Robbins pathology texts but progressed toward development of technology-based tools for medical education. This was driven by the belief that technology, by providing equal access to knowledge across the world, can be a powerful democratizing force.

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/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-pathmechdis-012419-032855
2021-01-24
2024-04-24
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