1932

Abstract

Among human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-associated disorders, celiac disease has an immunopathogenesis that is particularly well understood. The condition is characterized by hypersensitivity to cereal gluten proteins, and the disease lesion is localized in the gut. Still, the diagnosis can be made by detection of highly disease-specific autoantibodies to transglutaminase 2 in the blood. We now have mechanistic insights into how the disease-predisposing HLA-DQ molecules, via presentation of posttranslationally modified gluten peptides, are connected to the generation of these autoantibodies. This review presents our current understanding of the immunobiology of this common disorder that is positioned in the border zone between food hypersensitivity and autoimmunity.

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2023-01-24
2024-06-14
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