1932

Abstract

The life expectancy of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients has greatly increased over the past decade, and researchers and clinicians must now navigate complex disease manifestations that were not a concern prior to the development of modern therapies. Explosive growth in the number of CF animal models has also occurred over this time span, clarifying CF disease pathophysiology and creating opportunities to understand more complex disease processes associated with an aging CF population. This review focuses on the CF-associated pathologies of the gastrointestinal system and how animal models have increased our understanding of this complex multisystemic disease. Although CF is primarily recognized as a pulmonary disease, gastrointestinal pathology occurs very commonly and can affect the quality of life for these patients. Furthermore, we discuss how next-generation genetic engineering of larger animal models will impact the field's understanding of CF disease pathophysiology and the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

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2021-01-24
2024-06-14
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