1932

Abstract

Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) encompasses a group of malignancies that can arise at any point in the biliary tree. Although considered a rare cancer, the incidence of CCA is increasing globally. The silent and asymptomatic nature of these tumors, particularly in their early stages, in combination with their high aggressiveness, intra- and intertumor heterogeneity, and chemoresistance, significantly compromises the efficacy of current therapeutic options, contributing to a dismal prognosis. During the last few years, increasing efforts have been made to unveil the etiologies and pathogenesis of these tumors and to develop more effective therapies. In this review, we summarize current findings in the field of CCA, mainly focusing on the mechanisms of pathogenesis, cells of origin, genomic and epigenetic abnormalities, molecular alterations, chemoresistance, and therapies.

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2021-01-24
2024-06-16
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