1932

Abstract

Rather than serving as a mere onlooker, adipose tissue is a complex endocrine organ and active participant in disease initiation and progression. Disruptions of biological processes operating within adipose can disturb healthy systemic physiology, the sequelae of which include metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. A burgeoning interest in the field of adipose research has allowed for the elucidation of regulatory networks underlying both adipose tissue function and dysfunction. Despite this progress, few diseases are treated by targeting maladaptation in the adipose, an oft-overlooked organ. In this review, we elaborate on the distinct subtypes of adipocytes, their developmental origins and secretory roles, and the dynamic interplay at work within the tissue itself. Central to this discussion is the relationship between adipose and disease states, including obesity, cachexia, and infectious diseases, as we aim to leverage our wealth of knowledge for the development of novel and targeted therapeutics.

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2023-01-24
2024-06-18
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