1932

Abstract

Most cancer cases occur in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The sophisticated technical and human infrastructure needed for optimal diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of cancers is difficult enough in affluent countries; it is especially challenging in LMICs. In Western, educated, industrial, rich, democratic countries, there is a growing emphasis on and success with precision medicine, whereby targeted therapy is directed at cancers based on the specific genetic lesions in the cancer. Can such precision approaches be delivered in LMICs? We offer some examples of novel partnerships and creative solutions that suggest that precision medicine may be possible in LMICs given heavy doses of will, creativity, and persistence and a little luck.

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2022-01-24
2024-06-18
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