1932

Abstract

Potyviruses (viruses in the genus , family ) constitute the largest group of known plant-infecting RNA viruses and include many agriculturally important viruses that cause devastating epidemics and significant yield losses in many crops worldwide. Several potyviruses are recognized as the most economically important viral pathogens. Therefore, potyviruses are more studied than other groups of plant viruses. In the past decade, a large amount of knowledge has been generated to better understand potyviruses and their infection process. In this review, we list the top 10 economically important potyviruses and present a brief profile of each. We highlight recent exciting findings on the novel genome expression strategy and the biological functions of potyviral proteins and discuss recent advances in molecular plant–potyvirus interactions, particularly regarding the coevolutionary arms race. Finally, we summarize current disease control strategies, with a focus on biotechnology-based genetic resistance, and point out future research directions.

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2021-08-25
2024-06-18
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