1932

Abstract

Nutrition influences health throughout the life course. Good nutrition increases the probability of good pregnancy outcomes, proper childhood development, and healthy aging, and it lowers the probability of developing common diet-related chronic diseases, including obesity, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and type 2 diabetes. Despite the importance of diet and health, studying these exposures is among the most challenging in population sciences research. US and global food supplies are complex; eating patterns have shifted such that half of meals are eaten away from home, and there are thousands of food ingredients with myriad combinations. These complexities make dietary assessment and links to health challenging both for population sciences research and for public health policy and practice. Furthermore, most studies evaluating nutrition and health usually rely on self-report instruments prone to random and systematic measurement error. Scientific advances involve developing nutritional biomarkers and then applying these biomarkers as stand-alone nutritional exposures or for calibrating self-reports using specialized statistics.

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2023-04-03
2024-04-17
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