1932

Abstract

As with many Indigenous populations globally, American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) experience high rates of type 2 diabetes. Prevention efforts, ongoing medical care, patient self-management education, and support to prevent and reduce the risk of long-term complications must be developed to limit the impact of diabetes on individuals, families, and communities. Diabetes prevention and control require both individual- and community-level efforts as well as policies that attempt to mitigate contributing adverse socioeconomic factors. Congressional funding since 1998 continues to address the epidemic of diabetes in AI/AN groups with the Special Diabetes Program for Indians (SDPI), which has resulted in significant outcomes and key lessons that can inform new efforts to prevent diabetes in other populations and communities. The purpose of this review is to understand the context behind the epidemic of diabetes in AI/ANs, review the impact of the SDPI on prevention and control of diabetes as well as the translation of these strategies into clinical practice and their influence on health practice, and identify lessons learned for future efforts to address this ongoing challenge for AI/AN and other communities suffering from type 2 diabetes.

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2022-04-05
2024-06-24
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