1932

Abstract

Since the Blue Revolution began in the late 1960s, global aquaculture production has grown rapidly. Aquaculture now accounts for over half of the world's fish for direct human consumption and is expected to approach two-thirds by 2030. With aquaculture's growth, a number of high-profile concerns have arisen, including pollution, feeding practices, disease management and antibiotic use, habitat use, non-native species, food safety, fraud, animal welfare, impacts on traditional wild fisheries, access to water and space, market competition, and genetics. Managing these concerns requires thoughtful and well-designed policies and regulations. This manuscript reviews the contributions natural resource economics has made to evaluating aquaculture policy and regulation. Despite their valuable contributions, however, economists have been largely underrepresented in the debate. The primary influencers of aquaculture policies and regulations have been traditional fisheries managers, environmental groups, and natural scientists. We identify many important areas that should be more thoroughly addressed by economists.

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2019-10-05
2024-06-21
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