1932

Abstract

Seasonal influenza vaccines prevent influenza-related illnesses, hospitalizations, and deaths. However, these vaccines are not as effective as other viral vaccines, and there is clearly room for improvement. Here, we review the history of seasonal influenza vaccines, describe challenges associated with producing influenza vaccine antigens, and discuss the inherent difficulties of updating influenza vaccine strains each influenza season. We argue that seasonal influenza vaccines can be dramatically improved by modernizing antigen production processes and developing models that are better at predicting viral evolution. Resources should be specifically dedicated to improving seasonal influenza vaccines while developing entirely new vaccine platforms.

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2020-09-29
2024-04-22
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