1932

Abstract

The recent market approvals of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) gene therapies in Europe and the United States are landmark achievements in the history of modern science. These approvals are also anticipated to herald the emergence of a new class of therapies for monogenic disorders, which had hitherto been considered untreatable. These events can be viewed as stemming from the convergence of several important historical trends: the study of basic virology, the development of genomic technologies, the imperative for translational impact of National Institutes of Health–funded research, and the development of economic models for commercialization of rare disease therapies. In this review, these historical trends are described and the key developments that have enabled clinical rAAV gene therapies are discussed, along with an overview of the current state of the field and future directions.

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2019-09-29
2024-04-21
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