1932

Abstract

Techniques for atomic-resolution structural biology have evolved during the past several decades. Breakthroughs in instrumentation, sample preparation, and data analysis that occurred in the past decade have enabled characterization of viruses with an unprecedented level of detail. Here we review the recent advances in magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for structural analysis of viruses and viral assemblies. MAS NMR is a powerful method that yields information on 3D structures and dynamics in a broad range of experimental conditions. After a brief introduction, we discuss recent structural and functional studies of several viruses investigated with atomic resolution at various levels of structural organization, from individual domains of a membrane protein reconstituted into lipid bilayers to virus-like particles and intact viruses. We present examples of the unique information revealed by MAS NMR about drug binding, conduction mechanisms, interactions with cellular host factors, and DNA packaging in biologically relevant environments that are inaccessible by other methods.

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2021-09-29
2024-06-13
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