1932

Abstract

Subcellular organization is essential for life. Cells organize their functions into organelles to concentrate their machinery and supplies for optimal efficiency. Likewise, viruses organize their replication machinery into compartments or factories within their host cells for optimal replicative efficiency. In this review, we discuss how DNA viruses that infect both eukaryotic cells and bacteria assemble replication compartments for synthesis of progeny viral DNA and transcription of the viral genome. Eukaryotic DNA viruses assemble replication compartments in the nucleus of the host cell while DNA bacteriophages assemble compartments called phage nuclei in the bacterial cytoplasm. Thus, DNA viruses infecting host cells from different domains of life share common replication strategies.

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2022-09-29
2024-06-13
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