1932

Abstract

The conduct of clinical trials during the West Africa Ebola outbreak in 2014 highlighted many ethical challenges. How these challenges were addressed, what clinical studies were conducted during that outbreak, and the lessons learned for dealing with future outbreaks were the subject of a National Academy of Medicine committee report titled . This report suggested improvements for research during subsequent emerging or re-emerging outbreaks and is summarized in this review. We also discuss the current Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and highlight how the dialogue has changed and how successful clinical trials have been implemented. We conclude with a description of productive efforts to include pregnant women and children in therapeutic and vaccine trials during outbreaks that are currently ongoing.

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2020-09-29
2024-06-17
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  • Article Type: Review Article
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