1932

Abstract

Dendritic cell (DC) subsets are abundantly present in genital and intestinal mucosal tissue and are among the first innate immune cells that encounter human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) after sexual contact. Although DCs have specific characteristics that greatly enhance HIV-1 transmission, it is becoming evident that most DC subsets also have virus restriction mechanisms that exert selective pressure on the viruses during sexual transmission. In this review we discuss the current concepts of the immediate events following viral exposure at genital mucosal sites that lead to selection of specific HIV-1 variants called transmitted founder (TF) viruses. We highlight the importance of the TF HIV-1 phenotype and the role of different DC subsets in establishing infection. Understanding the biology of HIV-1 transmission will contribute to the design of novel treatment strategies preventing HIV-1 dissemination.

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2020-09-29
2024-06-14
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