1932

Abstract

While analyses of cell populations provide averaged information about viral infections, single-cell analyses offer individual consideration, thereby revealing a broad spectrum of diversity as well as identifying extreme phenotypes that can be exploited to further understand the complex virus-host interplay. Single-cell technologies applied in the context of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection proved to be valuable tools to help uncover specific biomarkers as well as novel candidate players in virus-host interactions. This review aims at providing an updated overview of single-cell analyses in the field of HIV and acquired knowledge on HIV infection, latency, and host response. Although HIV is a pioneering example, similar single-cell approaches have proven to be valuable for elucidating the behavior and virus-host interplay in a range of other viruses.

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2020-09-29
2024-06-21
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