1932

Abstract

Reverse genetics systems for viruses, the technology used to generate gene-engineered recombinant viruses from artificial genes, enable the study of the roles of the individual nucleotides and amino acids of viral genes and proteins in infectivity, replication, and pathogenicity. The successful development of a reverse genetics system for poliovirus in 1981 accelerated the establishment of protocols for other RNA viruses important for human health. Despite multiple efforts, rotavirus (RV), which causes severe gastroenteritis in infants, was refractory to reverse genetics analysis, and the first complete reverse genetics system for RV was established in 2017. This novel technique involves use of the fusogenic protein FAST (fusion-associated small transmembrane) derived from the bat-borne Nelson Bay orthoreovirus, which induces massive syncytium formation. Co-transfection of a FAST-expressing plasmid with complementary DNAs encoding RV genes enables rescue of recombinant RV. This review focuses on methodological insights into the reverse genetics system for RV and discusses applications and potential improvements to this system.

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2021-09-29
2024-06-14
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