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Abstract

Genetic alleles that contribute to enhanced susceptibility or resistance to viral infections and virally induced diseases have often been first identified in mice before humans due to the significant advantages of the murine system for genetic studies. Herein we review multiple discoveries that have revealed significant insights into virus-host interactions, all made using genetic mapping tools in mice. Factors that have been identified include innate and adaptive immunity genes that contribute to host defense against pathogenic viruses such as herpes viruses, flaviviruses, retroviruses, and coronaviruses. Understanding the genetic mechanisms that affect infectious disease outcomes will aid the development of personalized treatment and preventive strategies for pathogenic infections.

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2019-09-29
2024-04-18
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