1932

Abstract

SERINC genes encode for homologous multipass transmembrane proteins with unknown cellular function, despite being highly conserved across eukaryotes. Among the five SERINC genes found in humans, SERINC5 was shown to act as a powerful inhibitor of retroviruses. It is efficiently incorporated into virions and blocks the penetration of the viral core into target cells, by impairing the fusion process with a yet unclear mechanism. SERINC5 was also found to promote human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) virion neutralization by antibodies, indicating a pleiotropic activity, which remains mostly unexplored. Counteracting factors have emerged independently in at least three retrovirus lineages, underscoring their fundamental importance during retrovirus evolution. Nef and S2 of primate and equine lentiviruses, and glycoGag of gammaretroviruses, act similarly by targeting SERINC5 to endosomes and excluding it from virions. Here, we discuss the features that distinguish SERINC5 from other known restriction factors, delineating a yet unique class of antiviral inhibitors.

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2018-09-29
2024-06-20
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