1932

Abstract

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is one of the most studied of all human pathogens. One strain—HIV-1 group M—is responsible for a global pandemic that has infected >60 million people and killed >20 million. Understanding the stages of HIV infection has led to highly effective therapeutics in the form of antiviral drugs that target the viral enzymes reverse transcriptase, integrase, and protease as well as biotechnological developments in the form of retroviral and lentiviral vectors for the transduction of cells in tissue culture and, potentially, gene therapy. However, despite considerable research focus in this area, there is much we still do not understand about the HIV replicative cycle, particularly the first steps that are crucial to establishing a productive infection. One especially enigmatic player has been the HIV capsid. In this review, we discuss three aspects of the HIV capsid: its function as a structural shell, its role in mediating host interactions, and its vulnerability to antiviral activity.

Keyword(s): capsidHIVrestrictionTRIM5
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2018-09-29
2024-04-23
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