1932

Abstract

Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) particle assembly requires several protein:RNA interactions that vary widely in their character, from specific recognition of highly conserved and structured viral RNA elements to less specific interactions with variable RNA sequences. Genetic, biochemical, biophysical, and structural studies have illuminated how virion morphogenesis is accompanied by dramatic changes in the interactions among the protein and RNA virion components. The 5′ leader RNA element drives RNA recognition by Gag upon initiation of HIV-1 assembly and can assume variable conformations that influence translation, dimerization, and Gag recognition. As Gag multimerizes on the plasma membrane, forming immature particles, its RNA binding specificity transiently changes, enabling recognition of the A-rich composition of the viral genome. Initiation of assembly may also be regulated by occlusion of the membrane binding surface of Gag by tRNA. Finally, recent work has suggested that RNA interactions with viral enzymes may activate and ensure the accuracy of virion maturation.

Keyword(s): assemblyGagHIV-1packagingRNA
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2018-09-29
2024-04-22
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