1932

Abstract

My long career in virology has been a continuous learning exercise with a very modest start. Virology and related pertinent fields have changed significantly during my lifetime. Sometimes I wish that my career had just started and I could apply all available and state of the art technology to solving problems and explaining intriguing observations. I was always convinced that visiting growers’ fields is essential for researchers to get firsthand observations and knowledge of virus disease problems under field conditions. I never thought I would pursue so many avenues of research, yet it is true that research never ends. I enjoyed dissecting strain diversity in a very important plant pathogen like bean pod mottle virus (BPMV) and using BPMV-based vectors to address fundamental virology questions. Lastly, solving the enigma of the transmissible disease of and attempting to gain an understanding of the molecular basis of disease in a plant pathogenic fungus were thrilling.

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2018-09-29
2024-06-20
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