1932

Abstract

Viral DNA genomes have limited coding capacity and therefore harness cellular factors to facilitate replication of their genomes and generate progeny virions. Studies of viruses and how they interact with cellular processes have historically provided seminal insights into basic biology and disease mechanisms. The replicative life cycles of many DNA viruses have been shown to engage components of the host DNA damage and repair machinery. Viruses have evolved numerous strategies to navigate the cellular DNA damage response. By hijacking and manipulating cellular replication and repair processes, DNA viruses can selectively harness or abrogate distinct components of the cellular machinery to complete their life cycles. Here, we highlight consequences for viral replication and host genome integrity during the dynamic interactions between virus and host.

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2018-09-29
2024-05-28
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