1932

Abstract

Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a causative agent of multiple human cancers, including cervical and head and neck cancers. In these HPV-positive tumors, somatic mutations are caused by aberrant activation of DNA mutators such as members of the apolipoprotein B messenger RNA–editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3 (APOBEC3) family of cytidine deaminases. APOBEC3 proteins are most notable for their restriction of various viruses, including anti-HPV activity. However, the potential role of APOBEC3 proteins in HPV-induced cancer progression has recently garnered significant attention. Ongoing research stems from the observations that elevated APOBEC3 expression is driven by HPV oncogene expression and that APOBEC3 activity is likely a significant contributor to somatic mutagenesis in HPV-positive cancers. This review focuses on recent advances in the study of APOBEC3 proteins and their roles in HPV infection and HPV-driven oncogenesis. Further, we discuss critical gaps and unanswered questions in our understanding of APOBEC3 in virus-associated cancers.

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2022-09-29
2024-04-23
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