1932

Abstract

Over the past 20 years, our knowledge of virus diversity and abundance in subsurface environments has expanded dramatically through application of quantitative metagenomic approaches. In most subsurface environments, viral diversity and abundance rival viral diversity and abundance observed in surface environments. Most of these viruses are uncharacterized in terms of their hosts and replication cycles. Analysis of accessory metabolic genes encoded by subsurface viruses indicates that they evolved to replicate within the unique features of their environments. The key question remains: What role do these viruses play in the ecology and evolution of the environments in which they replicate? Undoubtedly, as more virologists examine the role of viruses in subsurface environments, new insights will emerge.

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2022-09-29
2024-06-19
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