1932

Abstract

RNA viruses are unique in their evolutionary capacity, exhibiting high mutation rates and frequent recombination. They rapidly adapt to environmental changes, such as shifts in immune pressure or pharmacological challenge. The evolution of RNA viruses has been brought into new focus with the recent developments of genetic and experimental tools to explore and manipulate the evolutionary dynamics of viral populations. These studies have uncovered new mechanisms that enable viruses to overcome evolutionary challenges in the environment and have emphasized the intimate relationship of viral populations with evolution. Here, we review some of the emerging viral and host mechanisms that underlie the evolution of RNA viruses. We also discuss new studies that demonstrate that the relationship between evolutionary dynamics and virus biology spans many spatial and temporal scales, affecting transmission dynamics within and between hosts as well as pathogenesis.

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2018-09-29
2024-06-17
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