1932

Abstract

The mammalian gastrointestinal tract (GIT) hosts a diverse and highly active microbiota composed of bacteria, eukaryotes, archaea, and viruses. Studies of the GIT microbiota date back more than a century, although modern techniques, including mouse models, sequencing technology, and novel therapeutics in humans, have been foundational to our understanding of the roles of commensal microbes in health and disease. Here, we review the impacts of the GIT microbiota on viral infection, both within the GIT and systemically. GIT-associated microbes and their metabolites alter the course of viral infection through a variety of mechanisms, including direct interactions with virions, alteration of the GIT landscape, and extensive regulation of innate and adaptive immunity. Mechanistic understanding of the full breadth of interactions between the GIT microbiota and the host is still lacking in many ways but will be vital for the development of novel therapeutics for viral and nonviral diseases alike.

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2023-09-29
2024-04-21
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