1932

Abstract

Plant viruses of the genus cause significant economic losses in various crops. The emergence of new tobamoviruses such as the tomato brown rugose fruit virus (ToBRFV) poses a major threat to global agriculture. Upon infection, plants mount a complex immune response to restrict virus replication and spread, involving a multilayered defense system that includes defense hormones, RNA silencing, and immune receptors. To counter these defenses, tobamoviruses have evolved various strategies to evade or suppress the different immune pathways. Understanding the interactions between tobamoviruses and the plant immune pathways is crucial for the development of effective control measures and genetic resistance to these viruses. In this review, we discuss past and current knowledge of the intricate relationship between tobamoviruses and host immunity. We use this knowledge to understand the emergence of ToBRFV and discuss potential approaches for the development of new resistance strategies to cope with emerging tobamoviruses.

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2023-09-29
2024-06-24
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