1932

Abstract

Abstract

Arthropod generalist predators (AGP) are widespread and abundant in both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. They feed upon herbivores, detritivores, and predators, and also on plant material and detritus. In turn, AGP serve as prey for larger predators. Several prominent AGP have become invasive when moved by humans beyond their native range. With complex trophic roles, AGP have diverse effects on other species in their introduced ranges. The invaders displace similar native species, primarily through competition, intraguild predation, transmission of disease, and escape from predation and/or parasites. Invasive AGP often reach higher densities and/or biomass than the native predators they replace, sometimes strengthening herbivore regulation when invasive AGP feed on key herbivores, but sometimes weakening herbivore suppression when they eat key predators. The complexity and unpredictability of ecological effects of invasive AGP underscores the high risk of adverse consequences of intentional introductions of these species (e.g., for biological control or aquaculture).

Keyword(s): antbeetlecrabcrayfishpraying mantiswasp
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/content/journals/10.1146/annurev.ecolsys.37.091305.110107
2006-12-01
2024-05-25
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  • Article Type: Review Article
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