1932

Abstract

Physiological dynamics in living cells and tissues are crucial for maintenance and regulation of their normal activities and functionalities. Tiny fluctuations in physiological microenvironments can leverage significant influences on cell growth, metabolism, differentiation, and apoptosis as well as disease evolution. Fluorescence imaging based on aggregation-induced emission luminogens (AIEgens) exhibits superior advantages in real-time sensing and monitoring of the physiological dynamics in living systems, including its unique properties such as high sensitivity and rapid response, flexible molecular design, and versatile nano- to mesostructural fabrication. The introduction of canonic AIEgens with long-wavelength, near-infrared, or microwave emission, persistent luminescence, and diversified excitation source (e.g., chemo- or bioluminescence) offers researchers a tool to evaluate the resulting molecules with excellent performance in response to subtle fluctuations in bioactivities with broader dimensionalities and deeper hierarchies.

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2021-07-27
2024-06-21
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