1932

Abstract

In pigs, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), or swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) complex, maps to chromosome 7. It consists of three regions, the class I and class III regions mapping to 7p1.1 and the class II region mapping to 7q1.1. The swine MHC is divided by the centromere, which is unique among mammals studied to date. The SLA complexspans between 2.4 and 2.7 Mb, depending on haplotype, and encodes approximately 150 loci, with at least 120 genes predicted to be functional. Here we update the whole SLA complex based on the Sscrofa11.1 build and annotate the organization for all recognized SLA genes and their allelic sequences. We present SLA nomenclature and typing methods and discuss the expression of SLA proteins, as well as their role in antigen presentation and immune, disease, and vaccine responses. Finally, we explore the role of SLA genes in transplantation and xenotransplantation and their importance in swine biomedical models.

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2020-02-15
2024-06-20
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