1932

Abstract

Snake venoms are primarily composed of proteins and peptides, and these toxins have developed high selectivity to their biological targets. This makes venoms interesting for exploration into protein evolution and structure–function relationships. A single venom protein superfamily can exhibit a variety of pharmacological effects; these variations in activity originate from differences in functional sites, domains, posttranslational modifications, and the formations of toxin complexes. In this review, we discuss examples of how the major venom protein superfamilies have diversified, as well as how newer technologies in the omics fields, such as genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics, can be used to characterize both known and unknown toxins.Because toxins are bioactive molecules with a rich diversity of activities, they can be useful as therapeutic and diagnostic agents, and successful examples of toxin applications in these areas are also reviewed. With the current rapid pace of technology, snake venom research and its applications will only continue to expand.

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2020-02-15
2024-06-22
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