1932

Abstract

The concept of influenza A virus (IAV) subpopulations emerged approximately 75 years ago, when Preben von Magnus described “incomplete” virus particles that interfere with the replication of infectious virus. It is now widely accepted that infectious particles constitute only a minor portion of biologically active IAV subpopulations. The IAV quasispecies is an extremely diverse swarm of biologically and genetically heterogeneous particle subpopulations that collectively influence the evolutionary fitness of the virus. This review summarizes the current knowledge of IAV subpopulations, focusing on their biologic and genomic diversity. It also discusses the potential roles IAV subpopulations play in virus pathogenesis and live attenuated influenza vaccine development.

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2020-02-15
2024-06-25
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