1932

Abstract

Advances in DNA sequencing and other technologies have greatly facilitated the identification of genetic risk factors for inherited diseases in dogs. We review recent technological developments based on selected examples from canine disease genetics. The identification of disease-causing variants in dogs with monogenic diseases may become a widely employed diagnostic approach in clinical veterinary medicine in the not-too-distant future. Diseases with complex modes of inheritance continue to pose challenges to researchers but have also become much more tangible than in the past. In addition to strategies for identifying genetic risk factors, we provide some thoughts on the interpretation of sequence variants that are largely inspired by developments in human clinical genetics.

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2023-02-15
2024-06-14
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