1932

Abstract

The coleoid cephalopods have the largest brains, and display the most complex behaviors, of all invertebrates. The molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie these remarkable advancements remain largely unexplored. Early molecular cloning studies of squid ion channel transcripts uncovered an unusually large number of A→I RNA editing sites that recoded codons. Further cloning of other neural transcripts showed a similar pattern. The advent of deep-sequencing technologies and the associated bioinformatics allowed the mapping of RNA editing events across the entire neural transcriptomes of various cephalopods. The results were remarkable: They contained orders of magnitude more recoding editing sites than any other taxon. Although RNA editing sites are abundant in most multicellular metazoans, they rarely recode. In cephalopods, the majority of neural transcripts are recoded. Recent studies have focused on whether these events are adaptive, as well as other noncanonical aspects of cephalopod RNA editing.

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2023-02-15
2024-04-14
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