1932

Abstract

As a convergent mechanism downstream of most oncogenic signals, control of mRNA translation has emerged as a key driver in establishing and tuning gene expression at specific steps in cancer development. Translation control is the most energetically expensive molecular process in the cell that needs to be modulated upon adaption to limited cellular resources, such as cellular stress. It thereby serves as the Achilles’ heel for cancer cells, particularly in response to changes in the microenvironment as well as to nutrient and metabolic shifts characteristic of cancer cell growth and metastasis. In this review, we discuss emerging discoveries that reveal how cancer cells modulate the translation machinery to adapt to oncogenic stress, the mechanisms that guide mRNA translation specificity in cancer, and how this selective mode of gene regulation provides advantages for cancer progression. We also provide an overview of promising preclinical and clinical efforts aimed at targeting the unique vulnerabilities of cancer cells that rely on the remodeling of mRNA translation for their infinite growth and survival.

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2020-03-04
2024-05-25
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