1932

Abstract

Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transitions (EMTs) are complex cellular processes where cells undergo dramatic changes in signaling, transcriptional programming, and cell shape, while directing the exit of cells from the epithelium and promoting migratory properties of the resulting mesenchyme. EMTs are essential for morphogenesis during development and are also a critical step in cancer progression and metastasis formation. Here we provide an overview of the molecular regulation of the EMT process during embryo development, focusing on chick and mouse gastrulation and neural crest development. We go on to describe how EMT regulators participate in the progression of pancreatic and breast cancer in mouse models, and discuss the parallels with developmental EMTs and how these help to understand cancer EMTs. We also highlight the differences between EMTs in tumor and in development to arrive at a broader view of cancer EMT. We conclude by discussing how further advances in the field will rely on in vivo dynamic imaging of the cellular events of EMT.

[Erratum, Closure]

An erratum has been published for this article:
Erratum: The Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition in Development and Cancer
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2020-03-04
2024-06-18
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