1932

Abstract

Organoid cultures have emerged as powerful model systems accelerating discoveries in cellular and cancer biology. These three-dimensional cultures are amenable to diverse techniques, including high-throughput genome and transcriptome sequencing, as well as genetic and biochemical perturbation, making these models well suited to answer a variety of questions. Recently, organoids have been generated from diverse human cancers, including breast, colon, pancreas, prostate, bladder, and liver cancers, and studies involving these models are expanding our knowledge of the etiology and characteristics of these malignancies. Co-cultures of cancer organoids with non-neoplastic stromal cells enable investigation of the tumor microenvironment. In addition, recent studies have established that organoids have a place in personalized medicine approaches. Here, we describe the application of organoid technology to cancer discovery and treatment.

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/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-cancerbio-030518-055702
2019-03-04
2024-06-13
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