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Abstract

T cell reactivity to tumor-specific neoantigens can drive endogenous and therapeutically induced antitumor immunity. However, most tumor-specific neoantigens are unique to each patient (private) and targeting them requires personalized therapy. A smaller subset of neoantigens includes epitopes that span recurrent mutation hotspots, translocations, or gene fusions in oncogenic drivers and tumor suppressors, as well as epitopes that arise from viral oncogenic proteins. Such antigens are likely to be shared across patients (public), uniformly expressed within a tumor, and required for cancer cell survival and fitness. Although a limited number of these public neoantigens are naturally immunogenic, recent studies affirm their clinical utility. In this review, we highlight efforts to target mutant KRAS, mutant p53, and epitopes derived from oncogenic viruses using T cells engineered with off-the-shelf T cell receptors. We also discuss the challenges and strategies to achieving more effective T cell therapies, particularly in the context of solid tumors.

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2023-04-11
2024-04-22
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