1932

Abstract

Mouse models of cancer immunology provide excellent systems in which to study and test biological mechanisms of the immune response against cancer. Historically, these models were designed to have different strengths based on the current major research questions at the time. As such, many mouse models of immunology used today were not originally developed to study current questions in the relatively new field of cancer immunology, but instead have been adapted for such purposes. In this review, we discuss various mouse models of cancer immunology in a historical context in order to provide a fuller perspective of each model's strengths. From this outlook, we discuss the current state of the art and strategies for tackling future modeling challenges.

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2022-04-11
2024-06-13
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